Monday, June 29, 2015

Shark Bytes!

Sharky Bytes
All the Sharky News that is Fit to Print

 Produced by:  Brandon Bethea and Lisa Kubotera


Less than one week left until Discovery's Shark Week! Can't control your excitement? Need to find a way to pass the time? Take a look at some fascinating recent stories that our Sea Save team has collected!


1. Shark Deterrent Research Shows Interesting Results


The Neuroecology Group at the University of Western Australia tested the effectiveness of different deterrents that has worked on other aquatic vertebrates or currently available commercial shark deterrents. They tested methods such as strobe lights, sounds, and bubble barriers. The article highlights the major findings from the research, and it will be published later this year. The scientists hope that this can be used to develop new shark deterrent technologies in the future. Read more...

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2. Deep Sea Sharks Showing Buoyancy



Scientists have believed for many years that sharks had negative buoyancy, or sank when they were not swimming. However, from a recent study scientists conducted by University of Hawai'i Maui's Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology have found that there are at least two species have sharks who have positive buoyancy, or who float, like other fish. They attached monitors onto shark’s fins that track their acceleration and found that the sharks accelerated more, or had more difficulty swimming down than up. The team believes this evolution in buoyancy could be so the sharks do not have to use their cold muscles to rise. Read more...


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3. Sharks, Humans Living so Close; Why Not More Attacks?



It seems obvious when I say there’s an increase in human population. There are more people who engage in recreational water sports where they enter shark territory, yet the shark attacks are not increasing. With ‘basic math, shark biology, improved shark detection methods, and other factors’, it keeps the shark attack numbers low. Although the news likes to spice things up with headlines like  ‘ “ Attack in Hawaii Triples”’ compared to eight years ago, when you look at the actual numbers, the attacks are in the single digits. So do not threat; there are less sharks in the waters (slow-reproduction, overfishing) and factoring in how uncommon attacks are, no one need to be paranoid about a “Jaws” situation. Read more...


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4. Rare, Huge Basking Shark Caught Off Australia
Picture of a basking shark
The world’s second biggest fish, the Basking Shark, was caught off the coast of Australia. This species has not been seen in 80 years and only three were reported in the last 160 years. Because the Basking Shark is so rare not much is known about them. The carcass has been taken to Museum Victoria for research purposes. Read more...




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5. The Great White Shark Song by ABC4




When it comes to music and sharks, nothing jumps out like the theme song from Jaws - dun-dun, dun-dun, dun-dun…. Andy Brandy Casagrande IV (aka "ABC4"), one of Discovery's Shark Week stars, gives us a different version and ventures beyond the cage to serenade his favorite shark. Read more...



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6. Could Drones Help Reduce Shark Attacks?

Image result for great white sharksThe Seal Beach Marine Safety Department may have found an unexpected use for their new $1,400 drone. Initially purchased to document the department's Jr. Lifeguard Program, officials have found other uses, such as  spotting sharks and strong currents. Could drones be a cost-effective way to help protect both sharks and swimmers? While drones often spark debates over privacy and other issues, this could be an interesting alternative to shark culling programs and prove invaluable to shark identification and research. Read more...

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7. Meet the Man Who’s Named 24 Shark Species

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If you think you've seen some interesting creatures in foreign markets, meet Dave Ebert. Over the past three decades, he's named 24 new species of sharks, rays, sawfish, and ghost sharks with 10 of those coming from one market in Taiwan alone. Ebert also estimates that he has 30 or more species in his California collection, which are awaiting formal identification. The article reports that of the 500 known species of sharks a fifth of those have been found in the decade alone. Let's hope that trend continues.
 Read more...

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8. Ranking of the Best, Most Unusual Sharks

We live by lists. Top 10 this, best 20 that. Why should sharks be any different? Check out this ranking of the best sharks on our planet, ranked by most unusual. Who will come out on top? The goblin shark, great white, or wobbegong? Read more...




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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Thursday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Week in Review: State of Europe's Seas Goes from Bad to Worse, Radiant Reefs Found Deep in the Red Sea, and More!

1. State of Europe's Seas Goes from Bad to Worse

The European Environment Agency published a the first State of Europe's Seas report this week. The report's findings were overall troublesome. Only 4% of marine species are currently considered to have a 'good' status. One of Europe's largest obstacles is that there is a real lack of data on the marine environment. Within the next 5 years, the EU will work to develop a number of aggressive conservation and improvement plans.  Read more...

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2. Radiant Reefs Found Deep in the Red Sea

Ever wonder what is 50-60 meters below the surface of the Red Sea? If so, your question has been answered! This week an article published in PLoS ONE revealed that there is a dazzling array of yellow, orange, and red coral in the deep water. The bright pigments survive in the low-light conditions to help animals deal with the dark conditions. Not only is this a fascinating finding but, these organisms may provide us with insight into how corals deal with stressful conditions.  Read more...

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3. How Will Cold-Loving Fish Respond to Warming Waters?

How will cold-loving Antarctic fish respond to warming ocean waters?
This week a team from Northeastern's Marine Science Center, led by professor William Detrich, received four year funding from the NSF to continue to research the warming Southern Ocean. The overall goal of the project if the fish living in the area are equipped to adapt to the increasing water temperature. Detrich describes how the team will team will observe temperature response on the red-blooded rockcod and white-blooded icefish. Antarctic fish are an essential part of the region's food web.  Read more...

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4. Western Australia Attacked Over Funding Halt for Shark Tagging and Tracking
The fisheries minister says researchers believe enough sharks had been tagged for behaviour analysis.
After years of financially backing, the West Austrialian government has stopped funding the tagging and tracking of sharks. This practice was used to learn more about the behavior of the great white shark population. Research will continue on the shark species in the area but on a much smaller scale Read more...

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5. Hospital Finds Plastic Inside Injured Sea Turtle


This week, a few loggerhead sea turtles were found washed ashore on the South Carolina coast. Two of the turtles were found with pieces of plastic bag and a red rubber balloon in their bodies. Both are now recovering from undernourishment and fin damage in the Sea Turtle Hospital at the SC Aquarium in Charleston. Read more...


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6. Face of Bizarre Sea Creature Hallucigenia Revealed

HallucigeniaBelieve it or not, that picture on the right is not a creature in a crazy science fiction film. That tiny sea creature is called the Hallucigenia and lived around 500 million years ago. A study published in Nature describes the fossils of this organism that were discovered over the last 100 years. To read some of the details and behaviors that scientist uncovered from the fossils, read the scientific paper here...



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7. The Amazing World of Antarctic Yeti Crabs


Kiwa tyleri male.
The Kiwa tyleri  is a small, hairy, white crab that lives atop of the hydrothermal vents in Antarctica's Southern Ocean. These 'yeti crabs' are hidden 8,500 feet underneath the ocean surface at temperatures of 721 degrees Fahrenheit. To read more about this species and see a number of pictures taken by remotely operated submersible vehicles (ROVs) click here...

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8. 10 Things We Learned About Tackling Plastic Ocean Waste

Turtle choking
Over the last few years the massive amount of plastic pollution has been proven to be extremely detrimental to the worlds aquatic ecosystem.the NGO warned us that the we "could end up with as much plastic in our oceans as fish". This article provides a nice summary of some of the top issues around plastic pollution. Read more...

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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Thursday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Friday, June 19, 2015

Week in Review: Countdown to Shark Week, The Media's Impact on Sharks, and More!

1. Countdown to Shark Week!

15 Days, 13 Hours, 45 Minutes, and who knows how many seconds...

As you can tell from our social media posts, we are extremely excited for Discovery Channel's 2015 Shark Week! This year, Sea Save has been selected as an official partner of this famous week. Discovery's new commitment to present factual stories that make people care about the subject , makes us so excited to see what is in the broadcast line up on July 5th! Take a look here for showtimes and schedules. 

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2. How Has the Media Changed Shark Populations?

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Is it possible that the most terrifying movie and book of 1975, Jaws, shaped the public view on sharks? This year marks the 40th anniversary of " the terrifying motion picture from the terrifying No 1 bestseller". This article discusses how this movie has changed the world's perception on the oceans and the drastic shark population decline after the release of JawsRead more...


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3. Deep-Sea Sharks Show Surprising Buoyancy

Deep-sea sharks show surprising buoyancyA recent study published in PLOS ONE reports that at least two species of deep- sea sharks have a small amount of positive buoyancy. Scientists attached monitors to sixgill and prickly sharks and measured their depth, swim speed, and acceleration. with this data, the team observed sharks swimming faster in their decent. These sharks were able to climb for minutes with almost no tail beating!   Read more...

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4. The Truth About the Great White Shark High Five

A 20-foot-long (6 m) female great white shark nicknamed Amanda off Guadalupe Island.Last week's Week in Review highlighted the popular video of the great white shark high five. Curious about the details of the situation? So were we! What was that great white shark doing with its fin out? the dive master was actually trying to push the shark away from the cage so that it did not injure itself.  The  shark was around 22 feet long which indicated that she was older than 50 years old and pregnant.  Read more...


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5. New Restrictions Aim to Prohibit People From Luring Great White Sharks

Plymouth officials closed public beaches after a shark sighting last year.
The state of Massachusetts has put new restrictions that will help keep sharks away from the shores. These rules ban people from luring sharks to shore by using chum or seal decoys. Both the warm waters and large seal populations have made the Massachusetts water appealing to the shark population. This new regulation will ensure the safety of both the sharks and beach-goers. Read more...


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6. "One Strange Dude" Discovered in Galapagos

Source: Nautilus Live/FacebookThis week, a group of new marine species were discovered while exploring the Galapagos Rift. In 1977, scientists first discovered hydrothermal vents in the area. Today the E/V Nautilus ocean exploration vessel was able to record video of the unique creatures.The picture on the right is a maroon-colored bethopelagic sea cucumber that was found. To see more pictures and video click here...



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7. Toxic Algae Bloom in Pacific Ocean Could Be Largest Ever

This year the West Coast has seen the largest toxic algae bloom that scientists have ever seen. Both the size and the location of these blooms are dangerous to the food chain. This year, animal rescue centers are seeing an increase in sea lions, dolphin, and pelican deaths. This was likely a result  of high levels of domoic acid accumulation in small fish and shellfish. Read more...



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8. New NASA Data Shows How the World is Running Out of Water

Image result for water levels
According to new NASA satellite data, the world's largest underground aquifers are being depleted at alarming rates. At this point, 21 of the world's 37 largest aquifers have passed their sustainability tipping points. This set of data was the first detailed assessment that demonstrated that the aquifers are not suitable for the growing population and increase in industry. Read more...

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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Thursday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Friday, June 12, 2015

Week in Review: Plant Growth and Climate Change, Vote Aids Deep Sea Corals in Much of Mid-Atlantic, and More!

1. Plant Growth and Climate Change

This week, a research team from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and University of Montana published a study in PLOS Biology on an additional impact of climate change. The report discusses that climate change could decrease the number of days when plants can grow by 11% by 2100. Declining plant growth will destroy forests, change habitats and food chains, as well as impact the economy of the region. The drastic impact of this change will vary around the world but, tropical regions could lose almost 200 growing days per year.  Read more...

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2. Vote Aids Deep Sea Corals in Much of Mid-Atlantic

On Wednesday, the Mid- Atlantic Fishery Management Council voted to protect thousands of miles of the Atlantic Ocean floor. This regulation will help preserve the deep water coral and organisms. Although this was originally opposed by the squid industry, a team of scientist and conservationists were able to define 15 areas to restrict bottom fishing. Read more...


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3. Protecting the Ocean Could Boost Economy by $900 Billion



According to the World Wildlife Fund, expanding the ocean's protected zones could create 180,000 jobs and generate $920 billion by 2050. Creating the marine protected areas will require some investment but, the benefits should be tripled through employment, coastal protection, and fisheries.  Read more...




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4. 100 New Marine Species Discovered in the Philippines
  This week, scientists from the California Academy of Sciences reported the discovery of 100 new species. These marine animals were found during a seven week exploration in the Philippines. A new heart urchin and 40 new varieties of nudibrachs are just a few of the new species. According to Steinhart Aquarium Director Bart Shepherd, "more humans have visited the moon than have dived to the twilight zone". As we continue to advance exploration technology, we will discover more and more!  Read more...


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5. Give Me Five!



This week some unexpected footage was posted online! A diver named Mauricio Hoyos Padilla, the director-general of a marine-conservation group called Pelagios-Kakunj√°, posted a video of a diver and a large great white shark coming into direct contact during a dive in Guadalupe. Watch the video of this large great white shark here...


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6. What Does 2 Degrees C Mean to You? 
CNN published a comprehensive list of 15  reasons how sea level rise may impact our globe over the next few decades. This list serves as a nice snapshot of a few of the issues that have been presented in some past Week in Review articles. Living in New York, Miami, or Houston? You'll have a particular interest in this article if you do!  Read more...



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7. Cost to Clean Oiled Santa Barbara Beaches Exceeds $60 Million

Oil spill on Santa Barbara County coast
Sea Save has tracked this tragic event from the beginning! Over the last few weeks, we have worked to help clean up the aftermath of this massive oil spill as well as documented the impact. According to area officials, the clean up has already cost $60 million and only 76% of the damaged beach has been cleaned. 158 birds and 85 marine mammals, including 6 dead sea lions, have been killed from the oil spill.  Read more...

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8. Polar Bears Caught Eating Dolphins for First Time

polar bears
Researchers have just recently recorded polar bears eating white-beaked dolphins. After eating, the polar bears froze the leftovers of the dolphins. As seal populations decrease, is it now necessary for polar bears to look for alternate food sources? Read more...





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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Thursday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Thursday, June 4, 2015

Week in Review: Ocean Species Set for Reshuffle, National Oceans Month, and More!

1. Ocean Species Set for Reshuffle


Scientists have predicted that by the end of the century the oceans could experience a massive reshuffling. A phenomena of this magnitude has not happened in more than 3 million years. You may be asking- why is this happening? The answer is climate change. Around 93% of the heat trapped by human greenhouse gas emissions end up in the ocean. A new study in Nature Climate Change compared the future climate and life against what is known about the distant past. Read more...

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2. Is June 8th Marked on Your Calendar?!


No? Well, June 8th is the World Oceans Day which also overlaps with National Oceans Month. In preparation for the month long awareness, President Obama made a speech on the importance of our oceans. He stated that " Our marine environments contribute to our food supply, bolster our economy, strengthen our national defense, and support important scientific research and innovation". We here at Sea Save are calling our readers and supporters to action this month. Whether it is working on a marine conservation project, signing a petition, or even just educating yourself on the current state of our oceans, every little bit helps!  Read more...
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3. Regrettable Status of Fish Stocks Conflicts with Political Commitments

This week, the European Commission published the annual report on fishing opportunities. The report shows that fish stocks in both the Atlantic and Mediterranean are deteriorating. The overfishing has impacted the cod and sole populations in the Atlantic and hake and swordfish in the Mediterranean. The report outlines a set of principles to be implemented on fishing in 2016. These principles help define compatible fishing rates with the maximum Sustainable Yield.  Read more...


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4. As the World Warms, Ocean Habitats Shrink

Warmer, lower-oxygen oceans will shift marine habitatsA team of researchers at the University of Washington have determined that the warmer water temperatures will increase animal's need for oxygen. While increasing the animal's metabolic need, the water temperature will also hold less oxygen. This will cause many species to migrate to new habitats and/or develop respiratory issues leading to death. The report, published in Science, studied the impact of increased water temperatures on four Atlantic Ocean species. Read more...


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5. World's First Ocean Cleaning System to be Deployed in 2016



A company named The Ocean Cleanup, announced that they will deploy the world's first passive pollution clean up system in 2016. The mechanism is a 2000m long floating structure that has the potential to clear out 42% of the plastic floating in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch over a ten year period of time. Although this system may not completely eradicate all ocean pollution, it would certainly be a step in the right direction! Read more...



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6. Underwater Views from Your Desk!

Galapagos IslandsUnfortunately, all of us can not spend every day scuba diving and taking in the magic of the underwater world. This month we are in for a treat! XL Catlin Seaview Survey, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, and the Chagos Conservation Trust have partnered on a new image project. Now Google will be able to provide the public with Street View imagery of 40 underwater locations around the world. This view will even let you virtually swim alongside marine life! Read more...

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7. Rare "Sea Serpent" Oarfish Found

Picture of Catalina Island giant oarfish
This week, a dead oarfish was found washed ashore on Catalina Island, CA. The fish was 14 feet in length and was found missing its tail. Oarfish are deep-sea creatures and are generally challenging to study. Although it is horrible to see the death of a rare creature, scientists have used this as an opportunity to learn more about the species. Read more...



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8. 40% of Europe's Sharks and Rays Face Extinction


Angelshark Squatina squatina
According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), around 40% of Europe's sharks and rays could be on the path to extinction. This prediction is a result of the troubling fishing practices and volumes reported by the European Commission. This article is a good example of the ripple effect in the marine food chain.   Read more...


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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Thursday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.