Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Week in Review: Chinese Shark Finning Industry Takes a Blow!

1. Cosco Refuses to Ship Shark Fins


This week, the Chinese Ocean Shipping Company or Cosco took a pledge against shipping products for the shark finning industry! This action was taken after 880 kgs of shark fins were found on a ship arriving from Panama. Both Cosco and Maersk, two of the four largest container operators, have now banned shark fin products on their boats. This makes up 68% of the industry. According to the World Wildlife Fund, " Hong Kong imports over 50% of shark fins being traded in the industry and of that 92% are imported by boat".  This ban is yet another significant act to reduce international shark fin trade! Read more...

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2. New Species of Beaked Whale Confirmed by DNA
Scientists revealed a new species of dolphin in a publication in Marine Mammal Science.  The scientists used specimens from museums and remote Arctic islands to identify a rare new species of beaked whale. The whale ranges from northern Japan across the Pacific Ocean to Alaska;s Aleutian Islands. DNA analysis from 178 beaked whales from around the Pacific Rim found with known examples of the new species. One of the specimens was a skeleton on display in an Alaska high school! The species is most closely related to the Arnoux's beaked whale from the Southern Hemisphere. A name for the new species of  beaked whales has not been finalized. Read more...

Credit: Don Graves


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3. Some Fish Tackle Ocean Warming by Pretending it's Night!

Tourists stand in front of huts that form part of the Lady Elliot Island Eco Resort where a turtle digs for food amongst the coral in the island's lagoon, north-east of the town of Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia, June 9, 2015.  REUTERS/David Gray
A new study of spiny damselfish reports that the fish that have best adapted to the high carbon levels in the water have flexible body clocks that help adapt to acidification. According to one of the authors of the study, Timothy Ravasi, "it seems the tolerant offspring may have adjusted their circadian clocks as if it was always night". Fish generally adapt their bodies every day because levels of carbon dioxide in the ocean peak at night and drop during sunlight hours when aquatic plants absorb the carbon dioxide.  Read more...


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4. What is that Mysterious Purple Orb?!

The crab and the orb.

Scientists on the exploration ship E/V Nautilus found a small purple orb while exploring an underwater formation west of the Channel Islands. The organism was 5cm with a foot and rhinophores. The strange glow was an effect of the lighting of the submersible and it was not bioluminescent. Samples have been sent to the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology to help confirm the new species. The E/V Nautilus has worked to map and explore the Channel Islands which spans 1,470 square miles of ocean. The team has found many new structures and habits during their study but this is the first new species discovered.   Read more...

Photo Credit: OET/Nautilus live


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5. US to Crack Down on Ocean Noise



Offshore-drilling-AFPIncreases in international shipping and oil drilling have been two major contributing factors to ocean noise pollution. The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) fisheries agency has drafted a proposal to establish noise limits with a standardized listening system. Collecting this data would be used to cross-reference against data on where marine life congregates. Increased noise in the ocean will impact marine communication, hunting, and navigation. Many oil companies have invested in quieter technology and ship noise was reduced under the United Nations' International Maritimes Organization voluntary guidelines in 2014.  Read more...


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Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Week in Review: Did the Recent LA Sewage Spill Contaminate the Ocean?


1. Los Angeles Sewage Shuts Down Ocean 20 Miles Away



Last week, 1.5 million gallons of sewage spewed from a 90 year old pipe that burst in Los Angeles. The cause of the rupture is not known yet and officials estimate that around 100,000 gallons spilled into the Los Angeles river.  The spill occurred on Monday, July 18th but additional ruptures occurred during the repair. Officials have taken samples of the ocean water to see how extensive the damage is and how far the sewage traveled before the containment.   Read more...

According to an updated article, a total of 2.4 million gallons of raw sewage spilled into the streets and into storm drains that feed into the river. Although the initial test results of the waters off of Long Beach and Seal Beach look safe, officials have kept the beach closed. The first samples show no excessive levels of bacteria.  

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2. US Navy Brakes Marine Laws

Whale breaching Twofold Bay

The San Francisco federal court ruled that the US Navy violated the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Although the low frequency active sonar system was approved by the National Marine Fisheries Service, it was concluded that the fisheries service " did not give adequate protection to areas of the world's oceans flagged by its own experts as biologically important".  The naval sonar systems can reach 235 decibels and can travel for hundreds of miles under water. It is difficult to prove but, some scientists believe that sonar has changed the behavior of whales. Read more...

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3. Queensland is Setting Shark Catch Limits

Hammerhead close-up shot.      © copyright by Avi KlapferLast week, we reported on the shark conservation activity that the WWF is undergoing by purchasing a fishing license. This week an article was released about a catch quota on endangered sharks. The Queensland government is allowing commercial fishers on the Great Barrier Reef to catch 600 tonnes of sharks and rays every year. Although Australia signed the international treaty in 2014 protecting scalloped and great hammerhead sharks, they decided to opt out of the protection and allow the fishing. There is some heavy negotiation on the sustainable yield of the species and which data can be reviewed to determine that value.  Read more...

Photo by Avi Klapfer
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4. Ocean Acidification- The Limits of Adaption


Ocean acidification -- the limits of adaptation
An article published in the journal Science Advances reveals that a single cell of alga will divide considerable faster when adapted to high carbon dioxide levels than when non-adjusted to the lab modeled ocean acidification condition. After one year, the growth rates relative to the control cultures did increase slightly but appears to level off. According to Dr. Lothar Scouter, the author of the study, "apparently the adaptation has its limits, and the negative impact on the growth rate can not be compensated completely by evolution".  Read more...

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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Monday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Week in Review: World Wildlife Fund Buys Shark Fishing Licence

1. World Wildlife Fund Buys Shark Fishing Licence


A fisherman holds a juvenile hammerhead shark caught in a gill net.This week, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) announced that it was seeking funds to cover the cost of the commercial shark fishing licence on the Great Barrier Reef. The group will retire the licence in order to save the sharks that it would otherwise be used to catch. The licence allows the owner to drag a 1.2km net anywhere along the length of the Great Barrier Reef. Last year, it was estimated that that licence was used to catch 10,000 sharks each year.  Read more... 

Picture from Jeff Rotman/NaturePL






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2. British Colombia Humpback Whale Sightings Becoming More Common

humpback whales
The Pacific Whale Watch Association says that the number of whales around the southern end of Vancouver Island are now being found in groups up to 20 whales. It was reported that there are now more than 21,000 humpbacks in the eastern North Pacific, up from 1,600 when whale hunting was banned in 1966. It is possible that the species has now adapted to the shift in habitat.  Read more...


Photo: CP
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3. Clouds Get High on Climate Change

This week, an article was published in the journal, Nature, revealing that changes in cloud patterns during the last three decades match those predicted by climate model simulations. The research team is comprised of scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California Riverside, and Colorado State University. Clouds substantially impact Earth's energy budget by reflecting solar radiation back to space and by restricting emission of thermal radiation to space. According to Mark Zelinka, the co-author of the paper, "increasing greenhouse gas concentrations and a recovery from volcanic radiative cooling are the primary causes in these decades".   Read more...


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4. Fish Get Arthritis, Too

According to the USC-led discovery, zebrafish and other ray-finned fish have synovial joints that can get creaky and are susceptible to arthritis. These joints produce a protein very similar to what lubricated joints in humans named lubricin. The research team found that removing the Lubricin gene from the zebrafish genome causes the same early onset arthritis in their jaws and fins. This regenerative ability in the species may help reveal potential arthritis cures which affect 52 million people.  Read more...


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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Monday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Monday, July 11, 2016

Week in Review: Are We Saying Goodbye to More Marine Species?


1. Whale and Winged Sharks Move Steps Closer to Extinction

scuba diving Koh Lanta Thailand snorkeling PADI courses
The International Union for the Conservation of Natural (IUCN) recently redefined whale and winged sharks as endangered species on the group's 'Red List'. The population of whale sharks has halved in the last 75 years! A lot of this is a result of increased human disturbances. Whale sharks continue to be killed by ship and propellers and fishing fleets. "While international whale shark trade is regulated through the species' listing on the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), more needs to be done domestically to protect whale sharks at a national level", said Simon Pierce, the INCU's lead Red List assessor.  Read more...

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2. Turtles Struck by Tumor Epidemic





Turtles in Australia's Great Barrier Reef have been affected by a herpes virus that causes fibropapollomatosis, a condition in which disfiguring tumors grown on and inside the body. See the very sad picture of this on the right. According to Karina Jones of James Cook University, " the tumors are benign but can grow up to about a foot in size and block the turtles' vision..this means they can't find food or see predators or boats". The results from Jones's team have not bee published yet but, roughly half the turtles in Cockle Bay at Magnetic Island were found with fibropapillomatosis. Read more...







Picture taken from the article in The Washington Post, photo taken by Karina Jones
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3. How Sea Otters Help Save the Planet


'You can do better than that': One otter leads the group in an aquatic exercise class in Moss Landing, CaliforniaA recent study published in Serendipity: An Ecologist's Quest to Understand Nature revealed that terrestrial and sea predators can change land and marine environments. The sea otter, referred to as "teddy bears of the oceans", has eating habits that make a huge impact to their environment. Sea otter's main prey are sea urchins and they need to eat about a quarter of its own body weight in food every day. James Estes, an American marine biologist, studied areas with diminished otter populations and found that huge sea urchins had littered the sea floor and completely consumed the kelp forests. These forests provide nourishment for fish an other sea animals. Sea otters are a "keystone species" and their position in the food chain is critical. To learn more about other keystone species read here.. For more information on the book Read more... 


Photo taken by Veronica Craft
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4. Nearly 2,000 Pounds of Illegal Shark Fins Found in Cargo

This week, National Geographic's Special Investigations Unit which focuses on wildlife crime released another summary of illegal activity. The largest bust this week was in Hong Kong where authorities discovered 1,940 pounds of illegal shark fins. The fins are suspected to have come from an endangered hammerhead shark. Hong Kong accounts for half the global legal trade in shark fins and last year 92% of the 6,300 tons of shake fin imports reached the country. Read more...  To learn more about busts on loggerhead sea turtle eggs, timber, and ivory read here...

Want to make a difference today? Add your picture to our ocean protection billboard. It will only take one picture and a few minutes to help the international cause. Read more here... 

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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Monday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Week in Review: Climate Change Threatening Penguins in Antarctica

1. Climate Change Threatening Penguins in Antarctica

Image result for adelie penguins
This week, an article published in the journal Scientific Reports estimated that Adelie penguin colonies could decline by as much as 60 percent by the end of the century. The team from the University of Delaware led by Megan Cimino revealed that the warming climates and melting glaciers are no longer beneficial for this penguin species. Camino stated that " it is only in recent decades that we know Adelie penguins population declines are associated with warming, which suggests that many regions of Antarctica have warmed too much and that further warming is no longer positive for the species". Climate change may decrease the quality and availability of nesting grounds and food.  Read more...

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2. Which Location will be the World-First Whale Heritage Site?

Image result for hervey bay
The World Cetacean Alliance (WCA) will begin a program to name Whale Heritage Sites. According to the WCA website, it had received 11 applications for sites. The three top locations are Hervey Bay in, North Vancouver Island in Canada, and Port Stephens in New South Wales. The locations will be destinations which implement and celebrate responsible and sustainable whale and dolphin watching.  Read more...


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3. Texas Bans Shark Fin Trade


On Friday, Texas put a ban on shark fin trade. The state is currently one of the main US centers for the product. Texas has seen a 240% increase in its trade in shark fins since 2010. Although shark finning is illegal in US waters, fins can still be exported and imported out of US states. Other states that have enacted a ban are Illinois, Maryland, Rhode Island, Delaware, and Massachusetts. Read more...


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4. Slowing Ocean Acidification with Kelp!
A team of scientists are researching a local fix for acidifying seawater. The scientists are experimenting with 150 feet of line holding thousands of tiny spores of kelp in Hood Canal in Washington state. The line will be submerged 10 feet underwater and the kelp seedlings will form thick, slimy ribbons of brown seaweed and in the process take up carbon dioxide and other nutrients. According to the Puget Sound Restoration Fund's senior scientist Joth Davis, "we know that kelp plants take up carbon dioxide and incorporate that carbon into their plant tissues. So we're very hopeful that not only carbon but nutrients can be taken up and essentially removed from the water column".    Read more...


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5. Still Skeptical About Climate Change?
Image result for sea ice

A new study published in Nature Geoscience revealed that changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean have attributed to the Arctic sea ice growth. This is the opposite of what is happening in the Arctic where the sea ice is declining rapidly. According to the study's lead scientist Gerald Meehl, "when you get changes in sea surface temperature in some areas of the tropics, you affect precipitation, that affects the amount of energy released in the atmosphere". Read more...



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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Monday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.


Sunday, June 26, 2016

Week in Review: Is There Finally A Way to Remove Plastic Pollution in the Ocean?

1. Floating Screen Will Sift Plastic Out of the Ocean


The Ocean Cleanup Foundation has created a prototype for a floating barrier that will gather the mass of plastic bits from bottles, bags, fishing nets, and other trash. The technology is currently in prototype phase but if it is successful, a 100km version will be launched between Hawaii and the US est coats in 2020. During the prototype phase, the team will monitor how the barrier will hold up in rough ocean currents and winds. The barrier is made of rectangular rubber buoys that keep the barrier afloat.   Read more...

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2. Every Sperm Whale May Have Descended From the Same Female

Whale
A new study in the journal Molecular Ecology reveals that it is possible that modern sperm whales descended from a single female. Scientists reviewed the mitochondrial DNA of the species and they were able to connect them to a single, "Eve"-like whale. DNA was taken from 1,633 whales. The social structures of sperm whales restrict the ability of sperm whales to differentiate and prevent new DNA from getting into the stream. Read more...


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3. New Study Highlights Hidden Values of Open Ocean
New study highlights hidden values of open ocean

A team of scientists from NOAA Fisheries and the University of California San Diego have attached a dollar value to some of the natural benefits of the ocean. The ecosystem services provided by the Eastern Tropical Pacific are worth close to $17 billion USD. This is the sum of the worth of commercial fishing, sport fishing, and the capture and storage of carbon. Rebuilding population of dolphins and fish may provide an additional $3.2 million dollars of worth.   Read more...


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4. Watch a World-Famous Pianist Perform Floating in the Arctic Ocean


This is so beautiful! The Washington Post reported that Ludivico Einaudi, an Italian pianist, played on a floating platform in the Arctic Ocean in Norway. Einadui reported that "there is a cold that I cannot describe really, because you feel a mass of cold". The performance was used to help promote the conservation of the Arctic Ocean.  Read more...




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5. Real World Ocean Rogue Waves Explained

ocean

This week, an article was published in Scientific Reports revealing a mathematical explaination for the rogue ocean waves that can develop and sink ships and overwhelm oil platforms with walls of water almost 25 meters high. The waves are created from a combination of constructive interference and and nonlinear effects. Rogue waves are different from tsunami waves because they typically last only 20 seconds before disappearing. The team of researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology, University College Dublin, and the Institut FEMTO-ST CNRS-Universite de Franche-Comte created and vetted an accurate model of how waves could combine under unusual circumstances to produce rogue waves. Read more...



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Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Week in Review: Are You Ready for the Best Week of the Year?

1. Shark Week 2016: What's on the Agenda this Year?

Underwater cameraman Duncan Brake films for Shark week 2016
5 MORE DAYS UNTIL SHARK WEEK! We can not control our excitement!!

Last year, 42 million viewers tuned in to watch Shark Week. The 2016 programming will kick off at on Sunday, June 26th at 8pm ET with Tiger Beach. Discovery is, once again, put together documentaries and programs with all real footage, research, and findings on sharks all over the world. The shows last year and this year are a true testament to Discovery Communications new branding as "The World's #1 Nonfiction Media Company".This year, Discovery will also have a live Shark Cam 24 hrs a day!  Read more...

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2. BUSTED: More Contraband Shark Fins!

Last week, we shared a story that was pretty similar to this one. Unfortunately, there are more incidents to report. National Geographic's Special Investigations Unit reported that there were cases of illegal possessions of shark fins, giant tortoises, crayfish, ivory, and timber last week. Read more...

These articles highlight the fact that although the international governments have laws against this activity, it continues. The shark fins were found in Taiwan and belonged to a protected shark species.  Read more...


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3. Deep Atlantic: Scientist Launch Ocean Mission

about 6


This week, the ATLAS project launched! Not sure exactly what that is referring to? The project is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme. Scientists and researchers around Europe and North America will spend 4 years studying unknown ecosystems and changing ocean currents. To learn more about the project, take a look at the video  here... To read more about the project and to follow the case studies,  read here... 




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4. Rhode Island Protects Sharks!



Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo recently signed a low that bans the sale possession, and trade of shark fins in the state. Rhode Island has become the 11th US state to ban the sale of shark fins. Rhode Island, also known as the 'Ocean State' has now made a commitment to help end global shark fin trade.   Read more...





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5. Sharks Experience Rush Hour Too



An article was recently published in the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology revealing that sharks at the Pacific atoll of Palmyra have a particularly active time of day. Using sonar originally designed for the US Navy, the scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara, were able to determine that shark activity in and out of the lagoon peaks between 7 and 8 o'clock every evening. The research also provided the researchers with a quantitative understanding of size classes in the area. Read more...



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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Monday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Sunday, June 12, 2016

Week in Review: Wildlife Crime Busts for Whale Sharks,Tigers, and More!

1. Wildlife Crime Busts for Whale Sharks, Tigers, and More!

Bust of High-Level Ring Laundering Large Marine Animals Leads to Release of 2 Whale Sharks Back Into the Wild
Around 18 months ago, two whale sharks, which were held illegally in underwater cages off the coast of an island in eastern Indonesia, were rescued. The sharks were likely destined for the illegal wildlife trade either in China or another country in Southeast Asia. The facility where the sharks were found was manage by a company that is owned by an unidentified Indonesian military officer. There have still been no arrests for this illegal activity. Read more...

This week, National Geographic also reviewed some recent wildlife crime busts. Read more...

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2. Overfishing and Nutrient Pollution Continue to Destroy Coral Reefs

This week, an article was published in Nature Communications revealed details from the largest and longest study on coral reefs. The study suggests that the wide spread coral deaths are being caused by a combination of overfishing, nutrient pollution, and pathogenic disease. The findings were made by researchers from six institutions following a three-year experiment that simulated both overfishing and nutrient pollution on a coral reef in the Florida Keys. In addition to the known stressors, the researchers found some interesting finding with parrotfish. In one part of the experiment, corals were so weakened by nitrogen and phosphrous pollution that when parrot fish would bite them, 62 percent of the corals would die. According to one scientist on the team "parrotfish are not the problem...the problem is when corals are so weakened they cannot withstand normal impacts". Read more...


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3. Sharks on a Plane!


I wish i could book a flight on this plane! I've been keeping my eyes open for it at every airport. Southwest Airlines debuted this plane on June 2nd and will partner, once again, with the Discovery Channel for its annual Shark Week program. According to Linda Rutherford, Southwest chief communication officer, stated that "Now more than ever, brands have to be creative and unique in their approach to reach new customers".  Read more...


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4. 7 Bizarre Facts About the Ocean
Spooky sounds from the deep

We love these slides that LiveScience put together about sea science! These were created in honor of World Oceans Day on June 8th. Here's a teaser to the set of slides: " though 94% of life on Earth is aquatic, about two-thirds of all marine life remains unidentified".  Read more...





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5. SeaWorld's Oldest Pilot Whale Dies

SeaWorld San Diego announced the death of one of the park's attractions, Bubbles the pilot whale.

This week, Bubbles, the oldest pilot whale at SeaWorld died. She was estimated to be in her fifties. Bubbles was captured in 1996, according to WDC, and was originally owned by another marine park. She was moved to SeaWorld in 1987. A necropsy will be performed to determine cause of death. Most female short-finned pilot whales usually have a maximum lifespan of around 60 years. Read more...



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Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Monday, June 6, 2016

Week in Review: The Death of a Whale Shark Brought to Justice Thanks to Social Media

1. The Death of a Whale Shark Brought to Justice Thanks to Social Media

Fisherman in Fujian claimed to have thought this whale shark was a "sea monster."
This event happened last month but, deserves some attention. Police in southwest China arrested two men after killing a whale shark. This arrest occurred after pictures of the whale shark went viral. This shark was seen every year by oil rig workers in the area and they described the whale shark as an "old friend". This arrest is another good example of the public bringing attention to injustice and calling for government action. The picture on the right breaks our hearts. Whale sharks are listed as "vulnerable" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, just a step above endangered. China also protects this animal and requires that a whale shark be set free if caught.    Read more...
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2. A Plan to Give Whales and Other Ocean Life Some Peace and Quiet

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, noise pollution in the ocean has significantly increased in the last 50 years. This has been a result of increased commercial shipping, oil and gas drilling, and other industrial work. The noise has been shown to interfere with the overall behavior of many creatures in the ocean. This week, the agency which protects marine life in US waters released a draft of the  Ocean Noise Strategy Roadmap. The roadmap will include more research on the effects of noise to gain additional understanding on the impact of the noise pollution in the ocean. Read more...

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3. Which Companies are Using Ocean Plastics?

Photo credit: AdidasIn previous versions of Week in Review we've covered reports on various plastic innovations. This week, EcoWatch summarized the 5 companies leading the charge in using ocean plastic in their products. Ocean plastic has been recovered and reused to make shoes, clothes, homes, packing material and cleaning products. We love the innovation that these companies have shown!   Read more...



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4. Study Shows Sharks Have Personalities
Study shows sharks have personalities

An article published in the Journal of Fish Biology revealed that there are individual personality differences in Port Jackson sharks. The lead author Evan Byrnes reports that "personality is no longer considered a strictly human characteristic, rather it is a characteristic deeply engrained in our evolutionary past". The trials in the study were designed to test the shark's boldness. The first test was to place the sharks in a tanks and see who long it took for them to emerge from their refuge box into a new environment. The second test exposed how they were able to handle stress.  Read more...

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5. Free Online Shark Course! 


Shark ImageWell, everyone knows that I already signed up for this one! Cornell University in collaboration with The University of Queensland created a new open online course titled 'Sharks! Global Biodiversity, Biology, and Conservation.' The course starts during Shark Week on June 28th and is completely free. All you need is an internet connection! Throughout the course, students will learn about the habits, anatomy, evolution, and ecological roles of sharks. Enroll in the course on the edx page  here...



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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Thursday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.