Friday, September 23, 2016

Week in Review: CITES BEGINS!!!

1. The Sea Save Foundation is set to attend the 2016 CITES Conference

Georgienne Bradley and Jay Ireland will be attending the 2016 CITES CoP17 World Wildlife Conference being held in Johannesburg, South Africa, on behalf of the Sea Save Foundation. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora begins on September 24th and runs through October 5th, aims to ensure that international trade of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. CITES is a legally binding agreement between its parties who are bound to regulate their country’s trade in a sustainable and traceable manner. CITES CoP16 made shark conservation a major focus and also highlighted the protection of manta rays and sawfish. Click here to find out more and stay turned for updates!

-----------------------------------------------


2. Global Fishing Watch, a new online based initiative to track rogue fishing


Google, Oceana, and Skytruth recently unveiled their new project, Global Fishing Watch, that pairs data mining technology with conservation skills to help crack down on illegal fishing. The new public web platform uses AIS satellite tracking technology, which commercial fishing vessels constantly update with their locations, along with an algorithm to track the routes of boats all over the world. Public users can then log on and identify if the vessel’s behavior is positive or negative. This exciting use of satellite tracking technology and big data processing is already bringing more transparency to the fishing industry, while fast-forwarding environmental progress. Read the full story here…


-----------------------------------------------

3. The Atlantic Ocean gets its first marine monument

President Obama used his executive powers this week to create the Atlantic Ocean’s first US Marine Monument. The Northeast Canyons & Sea Mounts Marine National Monument encompasses about 130 miles off the coast of Cape Cod, a region where ocean temps are projected to warm up 3 times faster than the global average. By banning oil and gas exploration and drilling, as well as most commercial fishing, several endangered species of whales and turtles, and ancient deep-sea coral will be protected for generations to come. Read more here…


-----------------------------------------------

4. New coral species and rare octopus discovered in Pacific Ocean

Scientists were very excited to discover what they believe to be a new species of coral reef during a recent deep-sea ocean dive expedition. They dubbed the violet hued coral “Purple Haze”. The previously unexplored Cook Seamount, a now extinct volcano 100 miles southwest of Hawaii’s Big Island, where the dive occurred is over 3,000 feet below sea level. Researchers were thrilled when they also encountered an extremely rare species, the Dumbo octopus. More details about the dive can be found here…


-----------------------------------------------

5. Sea Level Rise Worries Causes Marshall Islands Exodus


The Marshall Islands, low lying islands arranged in broken arcs around lagoons, has lost over a third of its population due to concerns with rising sea level. The mass exodus is bringing people to the United States through a compact of free association that allows immigrants to stay after their visas expire if they choose. The island experienced dramatic flood events, that historically would only occur once every few decades, three times during 2014. Temporary sea walls erected by the island’s residents are no match for the ocean waves though, and often have to be rebuilt after storm events. Read more here…


-----------------------------------------------

6. Arctic sea ice faces its second lowest level in history


After a dreary, cooler than average summer, scientists were shocked by a report released by NSIDC and NASA this week showing arctic sea ice at its second lowest recorded level ever. Scientists began monitoring sea ice, which naturally shrinks during the warmer summer months before returning in the winter, in 1978. The report showed 1.6 million square miles of sea ice present in the North Pole. The lowest record ever occurred in September 2016 with 1.31 million square miles of sea ice reported. Sea ice is important because it reflects solar radiation back into space, helping to maintain the planet’s temperature and also influencing the circulation of both the atmosphere and ocean. A warming ocean is to blame for the sea ice, which creates a positive feedback where less sea ice is created each subsequent winter. Read the full article here…

-----------------------------------------------



7. International conference unveils 136 new ocean conservation initiatives

90 different countries recently took part in a two-day conference geared towards raising capital for ocean conservation. The event reviled 136 new initiatives that will take on ocean challenges related to climate change and over-fishing. Participants committed more than $5.3 billion dollars to support the initiatives and help create 40 new marine sanctuaries around the world. You can read more about the efforts here…



-----------------------------------------------

Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Friday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Week in Review: Costa Rica Takes Major Steps Towards Becoming First Carbon Neutral Country

1. Costa Rica, Ecuador, & Columbia Create Underwater Highways for Marine Life

The Presidents of Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Columbia announced they are providing new marine life protection that extends to over 83,600 square miles of water. These newly established protected underwater highways will help manage ocean resources in a sustainable manner while helping to reach the UN's goal of protecting 10% of the world's oceans by 2020. Read more...




-----------------------------------------------

2. Costa Rica Goes 100% Renewable

Costa Rica, one of the world's "greenest" countries, recently proved just how serious they are about this title by powering their electricity grid for over 75 days using solely renewable energy sources. The country was able to turn off their diesel generators 300 days last year and are striving to beat that number this year as part of their goal to becoming the first carbon neutral country by 2085. Read more...




-----------------------------------------------

3. Secretary of the State Seeks to Curb Ocean Acidification & Illegal Fishing

John F. Kerry hosted the Our Ocean Conference to elevate the ocean in people's consciousness in an attempt to raise awareness of increasing ocean acidification and illegal fishing concerns. The conference enlisted help from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Operation Safe Ocean Network to combat these two problems. Read more...





-----------------------------------------------

4. MIT Report Links Ocean Acidification Changes to Increasing CO2 Levels


A new report published by MIT in the Journal of Geophysical Research has determined that increased ocean acidification is directly linked to increasing levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. MIT teamed up with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to study how increasing ocean acidification was affecting pterapods, a type of sea snail. Read more...




-----------------------------------------------

5. The Port of Rotterdam Debuts “Trash” Drone to Combat Ocean Pollution


The Port of Rotterdam unveiled their WasteShark, a trash eating drone boat, at the World Port Days Conference. The autonomous vessel can collect up to 1,120 pounds of waste from the busy port's waters before needing to be emptied. The trash drone also gathers data on water quality while designing more efficient collection routes over time. Read more...






-----------------------------------------------

6. Artist Brodie Neill Turns Marine Plastic Waste into Beauty

The 2016 London Design Biennele's "Utopia by Design" theme inspired artist Brodie Neill call attention to the world's marine plastic pollution problem. Collaborating with both environmentalists and scientists, Niell collected fragments of recycled ocean plastic salvaged from beaches around the world to create the terrazzo-effect table for the contest. Chips of blue, white, black, brown, and green plastic blend together to evoke ocean waves. Read more...



-----------------------------------------------

7. So Long and Thanks For All The Fish!

Scientists have developed underwater microphones that are able to distinguish between the distinctive clicks and whistles that dolphins use to communicate. Researchers from the Karadag Nature Reserve have recorded Black Sea bottle nose dolphins communicating with sentences up to five words long in length.  Read more...





Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Friday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Friday, September 9, 2016

Week in Review: IUCN Scientists Issue Climate Change Warning

1. Top Scientists Fear Rising Ocean Temps


The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) brought the work of over 80 scientists from a dozen of countries together for their annual State of Conservation Report. IUCN Scientists warn that soaring ocean temperatures are having effects on the behavior of marine species, reducing fishing zones, and spreading disease. The results of this meeting will be used to set up parameters for Sea Save’s next Climate Change Foundation campaign, which is currently being discussed at the SADIES conference in Africa this month. Read more...

-----------------------------------------------

2. Fishermen Battle Environmentalists Over Papahanaumokuakea

Papahanuaumokuakea, which recently became the world’s largest protected area when President Obama added over 440,000 square miles to its parameters, has created a rift between environmentalists and local fishermen. While the environmentalists applaud the president for protecting Hawaiian culture and marine life, Longline fishermen are claiming it’s hurting their $100 million industry. The new protection put into place now restricts fishing in 60% of the federal waters in Hawaii . Read more...


-----------------------------------------------

3. Saildrones Take On Climate Change 


Autonomous, wind powered saildrones are the latest agent of battling climate change. They are collecting data from the worlds’ ocean that will aid in protecting coastal barriers, tracking ocean acidification, and detect early signs of oil spills. The saildrones also have the ability to follow marine life, such as tagged sharks, as well as help scientists study aquatic populations. Read more...






-----------------------------------------------

4. Fred the Turtle, Burn Victim, Saved by 3D Printing


Meet Fred, the world’s first tortoise to receive a prosthetic shell designed from 3D printing technology. The lucky guy survived a forest fire in Brazil, however, lost 85% of his outer shell in the blaze. The synthetic shell, made from a corn-based plastic, is comprised of four separate pieces that fit around Fred much like a jigsaw puzzle.  Read more...



-----------------------------------------------

5. Naval Laser Data Technology Helps Discover New Coral Reef


A large field of circular mounds sitting behind the Great Barrier Reef were uncovered by a group of Australian scientists using laser data from the Australian Royal Navy. The doughnut shaped coral reef spans an area of 2,300 square miles, stretching from the Torres Strait to just north of Port Douglas. Scientists hope the discovery will help shed light on the history of the Great Barrier Reef.  Read more...



-----------------------------------------------

6. The Southern Ocean Gets Fresh


Nature recently published a scientific study that explains why we are seeing a reduction in the salinity of the Southern Ocean. Normally, sea ice forms during the winter, releases salt into the ocean which drifts northward, spreading the fresh water over a wide area. Due to climate change, less ice is being formed, which is increasing the amount of fresh water directly entering the Southern Ocean, which will directly impact future climate patterns.  Read more...




-----------------------------------------------



7Hermine Wreaks Havoc on the Northeast


Hermine, the first hurricane to fit Florida’s shores in over a decade, is still making herself known to the Northeastern US. Downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone, she still packs wind speeds as high as 205 miles per hour! Waves from Hermine are expected to create deadly surf and rip current conditions, as well as cause significant beach erosion. Read more...



-----------------------------------------------

8. Fabien Cousteau Saves Reef Ecosystems with 3D Printed Synthetic Coral




The Caribbean Island of Bonaire’s Harbor Village Beach Club has enlisted the help of Fabien Cousteau to help save their coral reefs. Cousteau uses 3-D printing technology to create artificial coral with the same shape, texture, and chemical makeup of organic coral. The experiment involves attracting floating baby coral polyps, algae, crabs and fish species to the synthetic coral to rebuild reef ecosystems. Read more...





-----------------------------------------------

9.  Venice, FL Attracts Shark Tooth Rush




Sharks lose thousands of teeth during their lifetime, often ending up in sandy creek bottoms and riverbeds near coastal areas. Venice, Florida; considered to be the “shark tooth capital of the world”, attracts many hunters of the dark-hued, fossilized teeth. Here you can often unearth shark teeth just by walking along the beach. The King of the Island is the one who can find a rare megalodon, now extinct, tooth. Read more...



-----------------------------------------------

Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Friday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Friday, September 2, 2016

Week in Review: How Much Plastic Debris Does the Ocean Hold?

1. Microplastic Discovered in the Deep, Open Ocean



Microplastics discovered in the deep, open oceanOur oceans have long been considered a major sink for plastic debris. Scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) will soon begin analyzing over twenty years of sample data collected using sediment traps from an ocean depth of 3,000 meters to gain a deeper understanding of microplastic accumulation in the deep sea. Their findings will be used to generate ocean model scenarios to reveal deeper insight into how microplastic pollution impacts the health of both humans and marine ecosystems around the world. Read more here... 

Photo Credit: National Oceanography Center

-----------------------------------------------

2. The Scientific Southern Elephant Seals!



The Southern Elephant Seal is doing what scientists can’t, which is studying the dynamics of ocean currents during the Antarctican winter. The temporary data monitors attached to the heads of the seals studies the Antarctic Polynya System, a patch of ocean that is surrounded by shelf ice and fails to freeze. The study, published in Nature Communications, shows that during this critical time for dense shelf water formation, fresh water is melting from southern sea ice and significantly reducing ocean density in the area. Changes to this global ocean overturning system, as a result of a warming climate, could potentially lead to the collapse of the Antarctic bottom water formation. Read more...


-----------------------------------------------

3. Greenland Sharks May Live for 400 Years

According to Science magazine, the Greenland Shark has now replaced the Bowhead Whale as the longest living vertebrate on Earth. The gray colored shark grows only one centimeter per year and can live for up to 400 years. An international team of biologists and physicists used a complex system involving chemical tests, growth measurements, and mathematical models using the lenses of the sharks’ eyes to determine their age. They believe the sharks’ slowed metabolism, due to their cold and deep water habitat, contributes to the sharks’ long lifespan. Read more...


-----------------------------------------------

4. Cannibal Sharks?!

The coprolite of an ancient creature with a corkscrew shaped rectum, unearthed at the Minoto Coalfield, is on display at the New Brunswick Museum. The fossilized scat is speculated to have come from an orthacanthus, a long, eel-like shark which lived during the Carboniferous Period, 300 million years ago. Rifled rectums are still present in modern sharks, which only have one foot long intestines, helping with the passage of their fecal matter and providing additional surface area to digest their meals.
 Read more...


-----------------------------------------------

5. Largest Protected Place on the Plant is Founded


Spire-like Mokumanamana is one of the many dramatic features in the Monument.

President Obama quadrupled the size of the Papahanaumakuakea Marine National Monument last Friday, making it the largest ecologically protected area on Earth. The monument is home to black coral estimated to be 4,500 years old and has six highly biologically diverse, massive seamounts. Commercial fishing and deep-sea mining is now off limits in the area, in an effort to preserve the delicate ecosystem. Read more...

Photo credit: Wayne Levin

-----------------------------------------------

6. America's First Offshore Wind Farm is Powered On!

Riffgat Offshore Wind Farm Nears Completion

America’s first offshore windfarm has just been constructed three miles off the coast of Rhode Island. The offshore windfarm, normally met with stiff opposition for marring coastal views, was met with great enthusiasm by the Block Island community. Area citizens were eager to help the environment and gain a more reliable power supply generated by the strong ocean breezes. Read more...

-----------------------------------------------



7. Sustainable Cinderblocks

The sustainably minded company, ByFusion, has sleuthed out an innovative way to convert the oceans’ plastic pollution into LEED certified cinderblocks. The blocks use 95% less Greenhouse Gas Emissions will preserving the world’s dwindling sand deposits used to make regular concrete blocks. Read more...

Photo Credit: ByFusion






-----------------------------------------------


Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Thursday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.