Wednesday, December 13, 2017

The 10th Annual Sea Save Foundation Year End Auction Is Here!

It's the most wonderful time of the year! Sea Save Foundation is running their tenth-anniversary auction, and this year it is bigger and more exotic than ever.

The destinations, resorts, and live-aboard names read like a "Who's Who" in SCUBA adventure. So what are you waiting for? Dive in and LIVE LARGE.


Check it all out HERE!   


Friday, December 8, 2017

Week in Review December 8, 2017: More Than 200 Nations Promise to Stop Ocean Plastic Waste, Japan Under Fire for Research Whaling, and More

1. More Than 200 Nations Promise to Stop Ocean Plastic Waste


The UNEP head Erik Solheim, wants "governments to ban and mandate the redesign of packaging." Last Wednesday, 200 nations passed a resolution to eliminate plastic pollution in the oceans. This could turn into a legally binding treaty. Countries have agreed to start monitoring the amount of plastic entering the ocean. Read More                        

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2.  Japan Under Fire for Research Whaling



japan whaling, whaling, japanJapan is under fire for its "research" whaling of sei whales in the Northwest Pacific as a possible violation of an international treaty on endangered species at a wildlife trade meeting in Geneva. CITES effectively bans the hunting of sei whales in the high seas. “Chances are high that Japan's whaling will be recognized as a violation" of the 1946 International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, says whaling expert Atsushi Ishii.
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3. Zinke Calls for Shrinking More National Monuments and Shifting Management of 10


pacific remote islands, pacific oceanInterior Secretary Ryan Zinke's final report on national monuments and marine sites calls for shrinking four national monuments and changing the way six land and marine sites are managed. The marine sites include Northeast Canyons and Seamounts in the Atlantic Ocean and both Rose Atoll and the Pacific Remote Islands in the Pacific Ocean.  “For several sites, Zinke recommended amending the monuments’ proclamation language to ensure activities such as grazing, hunting and fishing can continue.”
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4.  EU Invests 30 Million Euro to Counter Illegal Wildlife Trafficking



UNODC, United NationsAs part of a 30 million euro intervention, the European Union today signed a 17.2 million euro agreement with three UN institutions working jointly to reduce the illegal killing of wildlife and the trafficking of wildlife products in Eastern and Southern Africa and the Indian Ocean. The three offices -- the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES), and the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) -- will work together to strengthen cooperative management and criminal enforcement in the region.
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5.  Seafood Eaters Consume Tens of Thousands of Microplastics Every Year

mussels, microplastics, microplastics in mussels, plastic in mussels
A study from the University of Ghent found that an average serving of mussels contained 90 plastic particles. Eating two servings of mussels a week would mean ingesting 11,000 pieces of plastic annually. Plastic was found in nearly all of the hundreds of samples studied. The effects of plastic on humans is largely unknown.  
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6. International Accord Bans Fishing in Central Arctic Ocean


arctic ocean, icebreakerPOfficials from 10 nations last week finalized a historic accord that will prohibit commercial fishing for at least 16 years in the high seas of the central Arctic Ocean, which is now partly ice-free due to climate change. The ban gives scientists time to assess fishing stocks and distribution in the region. “The central Arctic Ocean is now the largest marine area to be proactively placed off-limits to fishing,” said Steve Ganey, who oversees Arctic marine projects at the Pew Charitable Trusts.
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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Friday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Friday, December 1, 2017

Week in Review December 1, 2017: 14,000 Dead Seahorses Seized in Illegal Trade Bust, Mexico Designates Largest Marine Reserve in North America, and More

1. 14,000 Dead Seahorses Seized in Illegal Trade Bust



dead seahorses, dried seahorsesThe Dutch government has seized 14,000 dead seahorses as part of a major crackdown on the illegal wildlife trade. Over the last two months, they have also confiscated a polar bear skin, 120 arapai fish, a green sea turtle shell, and 10 shipments of live coral. The seahorse smuggler was sentenced to just six months in prison, three of which were suspended.
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2.  Mexico Designates Largest Marine Reserve in North America


school of sharks, Revillagigedo Archipelago National ParkThe Revillagigedo Archipelago National Park, comprising 58,000 square miles of pristine ocean waters, has been designated a marine reserve. It consists of four volcanic islands: Claríon, Roca Partida, Socorro, and San Benedicto. The new protected area, about 240 miles southwest of the tip of Baja California, is home to “four species of sea turtles, more than 37 species of sharks and rays, and at least 366 species of fish, dozens of which are found nowhere else on Earth.”
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3. "Hidden" 99% of Microplastic Now Identifiable with Fluorescent Dye


microplastics, micro plastic fluorescent dyeMicroplastics are a major problem in our oceans, and scientists have come up with a way to identify the “lost 99%” of them.  Researchers at the University of Warwick found that microplastic floating in seawater can be dyed fluorescent green to help identify it. They found more microplastics than they could see using traditional methods. The scientists are working on a 3D distribution map of plastic circulating in the oceans.
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4.  Rare Outbreak of Bipartisanship on Fighting Ocean Pollution



marine debris, ocean pollution, garbage on the beach, Mokuleia Beach, Oahu HawaiiThe U.S. Senate unanimously passed the Save Our Seas Act of 2017, which reauthorizes a NOAA-led marine debris program for five years. It also encourages working with other nations to combat ocean pollution. The House will hopefully pass the legislation in 2018. “The Save Our Seas Act recognizes the interconnectedness of the world’s waterways and coastlines, and the need to address the issue of marine debris not only in the ocean but where it starts: in human hands.”
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5.  Australia's Great Barrier Reef Receives Successful Fertility Treatment


coral spawning, coral reef transplant, coral reef spawningLast November scientists at Heron Island Research Station collected coral sperm and eggs during the annual reef spawning event.  The scientists put them in tanks for fertilization and transplanted the coral back to the Great Barrier Reef. A year later, the juvenile coral had established themselves on the reef. The experiment was re-created this November, and new coral larvae have successfully settled.
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6. Ocean Enthusiasts Could Help Gauge Coastal Warming


surfboard laboratory, surferScientists want to enlist surfers, scuba divers, and anglers to monitor coastal areas vulnerable to climate change. They proposed the idea after scientists using surfboard laboratories recorded temperatures along several coastlines that were 1 degree Celsius warmer than those measured by satellite. Scuba divers could use their dive computers to measure temperatures and upload the data, and coastal anglers could use temperature-sensing wading boots.
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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Friday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Saturday, November 25, 2017

Week in Review November 24, 2017: Pacific Isles Could Lose 80% of Marine Life, Plastic Bottle Deposits Help Oceans and More

1. Pacific Islands Could Lose Up to 80% of Their Marine Life


pacific ocean island, climate changeDue to climate change, islands in the Pacific Ocean could lose 50 to 80 percent of their marine life. The year-round warm temperatures found there could ultimately lead to the demise of their marine life.  “Under climate change, the Pacific Islands region is projected to become warmer, less oxygenated, more acidic, and have lower production of plankton that form the base of oceanic food webs,” said lead author Rebecca Asch, Nereus Program alumnus and assistant professor at East Carolina University.
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2.  How Deposits on Plastic Bottles Helps the Oceans



plastic bottles, plastic waste, plastic on beachThe United Kingdom is studying a scheme to introduce deposits on plastic bottles. It is estimated that the UK could see recycle rates rise from 57 percent to 80 or 90 percent. Recycling would help reduce the estimated 8 million tons of plastic that enters the ocean each year.  
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3. Whales Are Right or Left "Handed"


whales left or right handed, humpback whale barrel rollLike humans beings, whales are left or right "handed" depending on their feeding strategy. But a recent study of blue whales shows that unlike humans, the whales adapted their strategies based on the availability of food. When eating krill at low depths, blue whales rolled 180 degrees to their right.  At shallower depths, they rolled 360 degrees to the left.
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4.  How Scientists Are Coping with the Death of Coral Reefs


Great Barrier ReefHurricanes, disease, pollution, acidification, overfishing, and rising sea temperatures are but a few of the dangers coral reefs today face. How are people who devote their lives to coral reef conservation coping with the daily barrage of bad news? The collapse of reefs around the world is taking a toll on the mental health of people who work to save them. Some try to find solace in taking action, while others find resilience in the support of their colleagues.
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5.  New Tool Tracks Sharks and Fishing Boats


Global Fishing Watch, Oceana, shark and fishing boat tracking toolOcean conservation group Oceana debuted Global Fishing Watch in 2016, a tool that tracks which boats are fishing, and can even help detect illegal fishing. A new tool adds a layer of shark data that reveals where fishing boats and sharks are colliding. Scientists tagged blue sharks, which can make up 50 to 90 percent of bycatch from longline fishing. Eventually fishery managers will be able to use the tool to help boats avoid species hotspots, especially pupping grounds.
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6. Kelp Forests Disappearing Worldwide


kelp forest, urchin barrenDue to a rise in sea temperature of 3 degrees Fahrenheit, kelp forests around the world are disappearing. The vast kelp forests of Eastern Tasmanian are already 95 percent gone. Warming waters caused a massive die-off, and then sea urchins moved in and feasted on the remaining kelp, leaving only "urchin barrens." Kelp can grow up to one foot a day and supports a variety of coldwater marine life.
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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Friday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Week in Review November 17, 2017: Trump Dines on Shark Fin Soup in Vietnam, Creation of the International Wildlife Conservation Council Announced and More

1. Trump Dines on Shark Fin Soup in Vietnam


Trump, Vietnamese President, Tran Dai QuangAlthough he is a picky eater, President Donald Trump ate shark fin soup in Vietnam during a dinner with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang. More than 70 million sharks are caught every year to support the shark fin trade.  This practice is unsustainable and in addition to being inhumane will result in global fisheries collapse and widespread human starvation. Many U.S. states have banned the sale and possession of shark fins, and a national shark fin ban bill has been introduced into Congress. 

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2.  
Creation of an International Wildlife Conservation Council Announced

Ryan Zinke, U.S. Secretary of the InteriorU.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke has created the International Wildlife Conservation Council. The council will “focus on increased public awareness domestically, regarding conservation, wildlife law enforcement, and economic benefits that result from U.S. citizens traveling abroad to hunt.” According to an Interior Department press release, “The Council will advise the Secretary of the Interior on the benefits that international recreational hunting has on foreign wildlife and habitat conservation, anti-poaching and illegal wildlife trafficking programs, and other ways in which international hunting benefits human populations in these areas.”
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3. Plastics Found in Animals from the Deepest Point in the Ocean

synthetic fiber, synthetic fibers, deep sea crustaceanA new study found that animals from the nearly 7-mile-deep Mariana Trench and other Pacific Ocean trenches are "contaminated with fibers that probably originated from plastic bottles, packaging and synthetic clothes.” The lead scientist, Dr. Alan Jamieson, said, “There is now no doubt that plastics pollution is so pervasive that nowhere – no matter how remote – is immune.” Between 50 and 100 percent of the 90 crustaceans analyzed contained synthetic fibers.
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4.  2016 Mass Coral Bleaching off of Western Australia Most Severe Ever Recorded

coral bleaching, Western Australia, coral bleaching KimberleyIn 2016 a mass coral bleaching caused by an El Nino heat wave affected up to 93 percent of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Research published this week reveals that the event impacted some 57 to 87 percent of the coral at the Kimberley site, an area that was thought to be resistant to bleaching. This is the first time that "Kimberley's famously tough inshore coral reefs have been affected by a mass bleaching event."
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5.  Rare Seahorses Found in River Thames

short snouted seahorse, River ThamesShort-snouted seahorses have been found thriving in London's Thames River. Seahorses are “sticklers for clean water,” so their appearance is a testament to the cleanup of the river once declared biologically dead.  Short-snouted and spiny seahorses were first spotted in 2008 and then legally protected. Surprisingly, the restored Thames is now also home to harbor seals, porpoises, otters, and wild salmon.  
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6. Dinosaur-Age Shark with 300 'Frilled' Teeth Caught off Portuguese Coast

frilled shark, deep sea sharkA frilled shark, a creature dubbed a “living fossil,” was caught accidentally off of Portugal. The rare find gives researchers a chance to study a species that hasn't changed in 80 million years. The individual was caught at a depth of 2,300 feet. The frilled shark has a gestation period of between one and two years. The frilled shark is not considered endangered, but it is protected in some areas of Australia and Europe.
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Be sure to "LIKE" http://facebook.com/SeaSave to ensure our "Week in Review" is delivered to your newsfeed every Friday. 

Sea Save Foundation is committed to raising awareness of marine conservation. The Week in Review is a team effort produced by the Sea Save staff to provide a weekly summary of the latest in marine research, policy, and news.